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Posts Tagged ‘William Morris’

It was with some shock that I realised this morning that it was 1 December, and that I had no idea what to use as a theme for this year’s December blogging extravaganza. To be honest, it’s not surprising that this hadn’t been a priority. I haven’t written here since 31 December last year. Life since then has been unexpected, and I have not been able to set myself to write. Realistically, I won’t have much time to write for most of December, but I don’t want to stop doing this project. It’s fun to find ideas for a post every day.  If I don’t have the time to write, and I definitely don’t have the talent to draw my posts, what to do? About 20 minutes ago (before I started writing this post), it occurred to me to call upon the Pre-Raphaelites for aid.  (Yes, I have a Pre-Raphaelite Bat Signal equivalent.) The challenge, then, is this: to post the Pre-Raphaelite works of art, without comment, which provide striking clues as to how I have spent my day.

And so it begins. (more…)

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The Pre-Raphaelite Society explaining National #PRBDay 2015

The Pre-Raphaelite Society explaining National #PRBDay 2015

The first #PRBDay was organised by the Pre-Raphaelite Society on 8 September 2012, to celebrate 164 years since the founding of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, in a small house on Gower Street, in London. I used to walk past this house most lunchtimes when I worked on London (6.5 years!) and it always made me terribly delighted imagining the conversations they must have had behind that front door.

I’ve been following the enormously busy Twitter thread (#PRBDay, as above), since I got up much, much later than planned today, and I really recommend dropping in on it throughout the day, or, you know, if you have the time, staying glued to it all day (which I would love to do). Serena Trowbridge, editor of the Review of the PreRaphaelite Society and creator of the Culture and Anarchy blog, will be there to chat to (@serena_t), along with Madeleine Pierce, coordinator of the Society’s London and South East Chapter (@nouveaudigital); she also writes the blog Nouveau Digital: Digital and the Pre-Raphaelites. (more…)

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La Belle Iseult (1858) by William Morris (1834-1896).  Oil on canvas. Tate Britain.

La Belle Iseult (1858) by William Morris (1834-1896). Oil on canvas. Tate Britain.

I’ve always been impressed by the (first and second wave) Pre-Raphaelites’ many talents. They were not just artists, and as a lifelong student of languages (medieval languages in particular), William Morris’ work in translating Old French and Old Norse romances and epics, is of particular interest. When I first began researching the use of original medieval works by the Pre-Raphaelites, I was focusing more on such use in their art. Morris’ only painting, of Janey Morris as La Belle Iseult, is an obvious example (look to the left). (more…)

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"Strawberry Thief", 1883, designed by William Morris (1834-1896), made by Morris & Co. (Victoria & Albert Museum)

“Strawberry Thief”, 1883, designed by William Morris (1834-1896), made by Morris & Co. (Victoria & Albert Museum)

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London in a heatwave (officially!) is the worst time and place in which to be. I’m craving cold, ice, and snow, with the warmth that comes from thick coats, hats, and scarves. I want to be iceskating in Victorian times. I want to be dressed like the woman below as I skate.

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La Belle Iseult, by William Morris (1858, oil on canvas, Tate Britain ; image via BBC Your Paintings)

I began the Victorian Vendredi series last week with a teaser for this week’s post. That teaser was the painting you see now to the right William Morris’s only completed painting, the model being Jane Burden, who later became his wife. On the reverse of the canvas, he wrote to her

I cannot paint you, but I love you

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Having enjoyed bringing a bit more structure to my blog with Medieval Mondays, I decided to pay regular homage to the blog’s name with another regular feature, Victorian Vendredi. (more…)

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