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Posts Tagged ‘Social Media’

Kathleen Neal – my own GCMRS 2013 doppelgänger (sort of – it’s all in our names) – issued the above challenge in the name of the Monash Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies on 5 October, and Twitter exploded under the hashtag #MedFemList. My own list was as follows:

Octavien de Saint-Gelais (b. 1468-d. 1502), Translation of Ovid's Epistulae heroidum. Cognac, 1496-1498, Library of Congress Manuscripts Department, Western Section, Fr. 875, Parchment

Octavien de Saint-Gelais (b. 1468-d. 1502), Translation of Ovid’s Epistulae heroidum. Cognac, 1496-1498, Library of Congress Manuscripts Department, Western Section, Fr. 875, Parchment

Real-life friend and medievalist Dr Kate Mathis of the Women’s Poetry in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales project, admitted to blatantly cheating with a series of tweets organised by themes – primarily medievalists working on Irish, Welsh, and Scottish material. I responded with a declaration of my intention to cheat by writing a blogpost on the subject as opposed to several more tweets. Et voilĂ , the MedFemList Cheating blogpost, to meet my Medieval Monday obligations! (more…)

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I’ve just about managed to move forward into the 21st century – the opportunity to revel in Wimbledon without thinking that I should be rushing off to hear conference papers has been decidedly helpful in that regard – following a wonderful week in Leeds at my first ever International Medieval Congress. That said, I now have weeks of blog material for Medieval Mondays, as well as years of research material, just out of that one week. As an introduction to those weeks of blogging, today’s post contains my initial thoughts on the conference and on what I could do to be better prepared for next year’s extravaganza. (more…)

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Until I get round to writing up my account of the week just gone by, when I was tweeting for Voices for the Library, here’s a great definition of libraries. It comes via this week’s Voice for the Library, Hong-Anh Nguyen (Codename: Dewey Decibelle)

The great unsold truth of libraries.

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… for a week, anyway.

Voices for the Library

Voices for the Library

World domination needs must start small. Starting on Monday 13 May – just two days to go! – I will be Taking over Twitter through @voiceslibrary.

The Twitter Takeover began in the week leading up to National Libraries Day on Saturday 9 February, 2013. I was one of seven libraries to take on a day of tweeting through the Library Voices account, the purpose of the exercise being to fight against the closures of libraries and the replacement of librarians with volunteers by showing what we do and how we and our places of work are valuable, essential parts of society. The need to demonstrate this has not gone away since National Libraries Day; in fact, it is more important than ever before, as cuts continue and deepen.

As a regular user of public libraries whose local library has been replaced with a volunteer-run book-lending service, I only get frustrated every time I go in there. The lack of training and experience shows in every interaction. I look at what the service ought to be, I remember the wonder of the local library and librarians who helped bring me up (that is how often I was there), and I experience what this other place is now, and I realise that we need to fight harder than ever to stop this becoming the norm.

The more people that think about what libraries mean to them, and the more people who share those feelings, and act upon the need to keep them alive, both now and in the future, are a crucial part of Voices for the Library. Just look at the several testimonies to libraries on the website. This excerpt from Carola’s story of Orkney Libraries is typical, and shows how essential libraries are to the past, present, and future:

Carola's testimony, on Voices for the Library

Carola’s testimony, on Voices for the Library

I’m still working out my full plan for the week. I will spend some time introducing you all to my library world, but that’s not enough. This week is not really supposed to be about me. I need to talk about libraries and what they have done for me as a reader and researcher, how they have helped to bring me this far, and how I want to make sure that they are around to take me as far as I can go. I need to talk about how libraries and librarians must be there to help current and future generations on their path into and inside the library.

I hope to see you all on Twitter from Monday morning onwards.

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A final Merry Christmas to all! I hope that you had a lovely time with family and friends, and that you’re looking forward to Hogmanay and the New Year. I decided to fully embrace the #Reverb12 spirit and take a few days off from the phone and the computer to focus on family, friends, and food – all the important parts of Christmas and of life. It’s been great, and I’ve missed being online and on the phone much less than I thought I would, so I think that I will be repeating that exercise every so often. I also think I need to get a Nintendo Wii as soon as possible. (more…)

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Art Nouveau Labyrinth

Art Nouveau Labyrinth

I’m no artist; I haven’t done any drawing in a very long time. So I couldn’t produce art like the mash-ups scattered throughout this blog post, no matter how I wish that I could. However, I know that my writing skills aren’t too bad, so this is my attempt to create a mash-up of my very own, and in so doing to move forward one post in two separate blogging projects. (more…)

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British Library Centre for Conservation – follow the blue dots

I had planned to write my post on CPD23 Thing Sixteen (Advocacy, speaking up for the profession, and getting published) tonight, but I’ve just read the official post thereupon, and I have a lot of reading to do to write a properly considered response.

Fortunately, I had the honour of being invited to an event at the British Library on Friday morning, for Library staff and their guests, on the future of reading, organised by Liquid Information. It’s better to write my report of the discussions sooner rather than later. The event took the form of short presentations by academics, librarians, software designers, journalists, designers, and artists. They had been asked to look at the following questions: (more…)

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