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Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

the-art-of-rebellionBlogtober hasn’t quite worked out for me this year. Real life would not have it so, and so that commitment, made to myself, must be put off until another time. Maybe I’ll take part in Blogtober in March. Nobody will see that coming. Happily, I am not so busy that I cannot honour blogging commitments of a smaller nature. Today’s post is a book review for France Book Tours. It’s nice to do a little writing here and there. O dear; “nice” is such an offensively bland word for what I’m trying to say here. Clearly, I need to consider a post on the art of writing at some point, but today is all about the art of rebellion. As a secondary school librarian, I have become accustomed to the daily tempests of the adolescent life, so Gabbi seemed a rather familiar character, albeit with very different concerns.

I have tried not to put too many spoilers into my review, but it does include discussion of plot points, particularly as regards the story’s ending, so you may wish to skim past it to the giveaway (if you’re in Canada). The review also discusses an attempted rape which takes place in the story. (more…)

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I was informed today by a friend that today (8 October) is World Octopus Day. Given that my familiar is an octopus – specifically an octopus adorabilis – I could not let this auspicious day pass without mention. (more…)

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Je suis Charlie: one of the many heartbreaking tributes by cartoonists across the world. (This one by Jean Julien, via Twitter)

Je suis Charlie: one of the many heartbreaking tributes by cartoonists across the world. (This one by Jean Julien, via Twitter)

Nous sommes tous Charlie, aujourd’hui, et nous serons toujours Charlie. The murders and woundings of thé staff of Charlie Hebdo today are heartbreaking. The cartoon tributes, like these drawn by friends and colleagues of those killed or injured, and by cartoonists across the world are painful to see, and show all the skill of their creators, and their ability to make you cry. I hope that these artists, and that all other journalists, writers, and artists, never lose their willingness to confront the kind of people behind such hate-filled violence. I feel rather useless in knowing how to respond to this; I hate living in a world where it’s becoming increasingly necessary to think about how to respond to such senseless, needless acts of destruction. (more…)

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Alas, dear readers, I had to leave Paris after a delightful week of boats up and down the Seine, stunning gardens, sumptuous buildings and beaucoup de soleil. Life must continue, and there is much to be done, within and outwith blogging.

In the meantime, please enjoy this account of a friend’s pilgrimage to the Land of L. M. Montgomery. Once I get back to full strength, I would like to see more of the world and a return to Canada, to see it in more detail and in a more relaxed fashion is very near the top of the list. Anabel may well have convinced me to start on Prince Edward Island.

The Glasgow Gallivanter

I couldn’t come to Nova Scotia and not detour onto Prince Edward Island, Canada’s smallest province and the location for LM Montgomery’s books. I read Anne of Green Gables and all the sequels as a child and have reread the first book several times since, most recently a few years ago when a prequel (Before Green Gables by Budge Wilson) came out. I was pleasantly surprised at how close to the spirit of Anne that book was, and had to read the original again to check if Wilson had got her facts right. She had. It all dovetailed perfectly, and the story ended with Anne sitting on a station platform waiting to be collected – just where the “real” story begins.

Lucy Maud Montgomery (Maud) was born on PEI, and moved to live with her grandparents in Cavendish (Avonlea in the books) before she was 2. Her mother had…

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À bientôt!

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