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Posts Tagged ‘Mid-week Museum’

Having not long returned from an all-women discussion on the Scottish Independence Referendum, organised by Women for Independence, and thus being very inspired and much better-informed, how could tonight’s Mid-week Museum post not be about a Scottish work of art?

The Monymusk Reliquary, National Museum of Scotland, c.700 A.D. (wood covered in bronze and silver plates)

The Monymusk Reliquary, National Museum of Scotland, c.700 A.D. (wood covered in bronze and silver plates)

The Monymusk Reliquary dates from the 8th century, and gets its name from Monymusk House, where it was kept for an unknown number of years before being acquired by the National Museum of Scotland in 1933. (more…)

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"Strawberry Thief", 1883, designed by William Morris (1834-1896), made by Morris & Co. (Victoria & Albert Museum)

“Strawberry Thief”, 1883, designed by William Morris (1834-1896), made by Morris & Co. (Victoria & Albert Museum)

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This week’s Mid-week Museum post, as with Monday’s Medieval Monday post on the Bayeux Tapestry, is of necessity brief, as much remains to be done before leaving on holiday this weekend.

An as-yet mysterious scene of a lady, her knight, and a dragon, at the Centre de l'imaginaire Arthurien,  Chateau de Compier, Paimpont Forest

An as-yet mysterious scene of a lady, her knight, and a dragon, at the Centre de l’imaginaire Arthurien, Chateau de Compier, Paimpont Forest

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On Saturday, I had a family trip out to London’s lovely Garden Museum, next to Lambeth Palace. It was great timing – the Gardens and Fashion: Spring/Summer-Autumn/Winter exhibition was finishing the following day. The exhibition proper was contained in a single room, comparatively small, if you are used to “blockbuster exhibitions”, but so rich in details that I could have spent at least an hour there luxuriating in the minutiae, had I been alone. There will be another post on the exhibition, in more detail, soon. (more…)

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Hildegard von Bingen, Rupertsberger Codex des Liber Scivias.

You may have noticed that Monday came and went without its/my habitual medieval commentary. If you look to the picture on the left, you will see why; I’m still not sure if it was good to have the headaches without the visions. Do they still burn witches? (more…)

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Tonight I watched the first episode of She-Wolves: England’s Early Queens, an excellent documentary series written and presented by historian Dr Helen Castor, currently being repeated on BBC4.

The first episode was about mother-in-law and daughter-in-law Matilda and Eleanor. I’ve known of the latter, whose more complete name is Eleanor of Aquitaine for as long as I can remember; I can’t remember the circumstances of our meeting, be it the compulsive reading, over and over, of the Ladybird Adventures from History series, or if it was through travelling in France on holidays, where we stayed for a week or so near Poitiers (part of Eleanor’s family’s territories) every year. I grew up fascinated by the idea of the fabled court of love, which led to my reading courtly literature, and thus, in part, to my career as a medievalist. So at least one thing in my museum has to be about her.

Effigy of Eleanor of Aquitaine from her tomb,  early 13th century, Fontevraud Abbey, Anjou, France (image via Wikimedia Commons)

Effigy of Eleanor of Aquitaine from her tomb, early 13th century, Fontevraud Abbey, Anjou, France (image via Wikimedia Commons)

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I’ve never been to Fontevraud Abbey, although I plan to do so, but I have seen the 19th century plaster cast of the effigy above in the Victoria and Albert Museum. I think that the reason that this caught my eye is, unsurprisingly, because she is reading. It’s a decidedly unusual tomb, for an equally unusual woman.

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Iris under a glass dome

It’s been a very busy week, so I decided that this week’s Mid-Week Museum post would take the form of a field trip, to look at one of my favourite museums in its entirety. But last night I forgot to click that all important ‘Publish’ button. Dear readers, please accept the humblest of humble apologies.

In 2009 The Last Tuesday Society opened its first permanent home: a shop, art gallery and museum on Mare Street in Hackney. Designed in the style of a 17th century Wunderkabinett, the shop sells a wide variety of curiosities including 19th century shrunken heads, taxidermy, narwhal tusks, carnivorous plants and articulated skeletons.

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