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Posts Tagged ‘Medieval Mondays’

Banquo's Ghost, "Macbeth", an entry in the Waterstone's LegoLit competition (Waterstone's blog)

Banquo’s Ghost, “Macbeth”, an entry in the Waterstone’s LegoLit competition (Waterstone’s blog)

A couple of weeks ago, I saw an article on Mental Floss and a Waterstones blogpost on scenes from literature recreated in Lego. I am going to dig my childhood box of Lego out of the attic, to have a shot at recreating some of my favourite scenes, and have also started buying the Lego Minifigures to build up a collection of characters; I’m slightly perplexed as to how I can fit a happy little pizza delivery man into, for example, a scene from Wuthering Heights, but that’s a discussion for another blogpost. Last night, I started looking at the Lego website, to see how much the Lego Castle series buildings would cost – it’s pretty much inevitable, given my interests, that I would start out making the more fantasy, gothic and medieval(ist) scenes. (more…)

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Sitting Ducks posterOn Saturday, I visited John Byrne‘s exhibition Sitting Ducks, at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. There were only two days of the exhibition left – sadly, it ended yesterday, else I would have encouraged you readers to get yourselves along to it forthwith. John Byrne has fascinated me since first I saw some of his work at the People’s Palace in Glasgow. What child could fail to love the banana boots designed for Billy Connolly? (more…)

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Since I again took up residence at the Family Seat, I have been looking at old research papers and files, to decide if they have any life in them, if they can be taken further. As long no well-meaning friends decide to send them off to the Rollings Reliable Baking Powder Company. Today’s Medieval Monday post is the first paper that I wrote for my MPhil in Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Glasgow University. The title of the paper is as unwieldy and cringeworthy as may be expected from someone who was just getting back in to academic writing, but I will not change it for this post. The full Ronseal-tastic, ‘it does what it says on the tin’, title is How does the court depicted by Béroul differ from that of Walter Map? A study of courtly life in Béroul’s “Tristan et Iseut” and Walter Map’s “De Nugis Curialium”. Gruesome, wouldn’t you agree? I may regret posting this paper online, in terms of its probably poor quality, but I still have a soft spot for it, as it opened up many areas of research, and some wonderful stories, to me. When I started writing it, I was unknowingly beginning the research for my MPhil dissertation, submitted two years later (I studied part-time) under the arguably more sophisticated (but no less wordy) title Female Power and Responsibility in Medieval Court Narrative: a Comparative Study of the Presentation of Women in the Celtic and French Literary Courts. (more…)

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VLlogo When my online persona of the Victorian Librarian, created while I was researching the Pre-Raphaelites’ use of libraries, began to assume a life of her own in the real world, it seemed time to create a logo to use on my forthcoming website, in letterheads, as a watermark (as will appear on all pages of my Chartership portfolio, which is almost complete), and on business cards (to be printed once the website is operational).

I have some very talented friends, and it was to one of these I turned to design my logo – Lora Jones. The image that you see above is the wonderful fruit of her labours. While the “VL” monogram on the open vellum pages of a book should be clear enough, the choice of floral iconography are almost certainly less so. Thus today’s Medieval Monday begins my more in-depth study of the medieval meanings and uses of the iris and the bluebell, two of my favourite flowers. (more…)

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It’s been great to get home in time for the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, one of the biggest events to hit my homeland, and it’s going so well – I’m thrilled. My tastes lie more to the cultural side of things than the sporting, but I defy you all not to find Erraid Davies inspirational and utterly adorable. However, today’s post is not about the current Commonwealth Games competition. Following extensive top-secret research, I have discovered that these games are not the first to have taken place in Glasgow. Follow me back into 1314……….. (more…)

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This weekend, I will be departing on a magical mystery tour of Brittany. One of the main things on my list is the Bayeux Tapestry; I first saw it when I was maybe seven or eight, I don’t remember, but I’ve never quite forgotten it. I do however add it to the list of the material things and experiences which made me a medievalist years later. (more…)

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Given this post is more an announcement of future regular posts resuming, as opposed to an actual post in itself, I thought I’d post some of my favourite pictures of medieval angels – on the basis that they act as heralds, and so tie into the theme of announcing. (more…)

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