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Archive for the ‘Food and Drink’ Category

I had a wonderful ten days in Toronto – much too little time! – and only arrived back this morning after a long overnight flight. Thus this post is brought to you by jetlag and a need to combat same by staying up till 8pm, all going well. I am nonetheless well aware that a detailed blog post, with the requirement of many coherent sentences flowing one from another, is beyond my capabilities today. You must content yourself with a list of some of my favourite moments; I’m certain to miss some out.  (more…)

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Happy New Year!

We at Victorian Librarian HQ (ok, me at Victorian Librarian HQ) would like to wish my readers a wonderful Hogmanay and New Year celebration, however you chose to spend it. I’ve spent mine making delicious foodstuffs, mostly. Tomorrow there will be some good eating! I hope that 2016 will be a great year for you all and for me. Thank you for reading the blog, be it once or regularly. (more…)

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This week, I’ve done some real planning for next month’s trip to Canada, specifically for Toronto, where I will spend the greatest part of my time. I’ll be spending said greatest part of my time with two friends I made last year, and it will be interesting to see how their Toronto compares to my Toronto, discovered on my previous two visits last year and in 2011. During my planning, I finally located my photos from last year’s trip, a great relief as I had thought them lost. They have helped me remember where I went, where I still want to go, and have jogged my memory about some of the places to which I would like to return. Here are some of those photos, unedited and unpolished (a skill still to learn), but with many words to accompany and explain them (verbosity being a skill/curse which is definitely not lacking). (more…)

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International Hug a Librarian Day: 1 March 2015 (image via the Day's official Facebook page)

International Hug a Librarian Day: 1 March 2015 (image via the Day’s official Facebook page)

Today is an important day for three reasons:

1) It is International Hug a Librarian Day – the picture above comes from the Facebook event page for this year. Sadly, a lot of libraries are closed today, so there’ll be no hugging, but if you have a librarian in your family and/or a librarian friend, let them know how much you appreciate them and their profession today. That’s the real point of today; as libraries and the professional status of their staff are under constant threat, there’s an ever growing need to demonstrate the importance, and the necessity, of the institutions and their people in society. Many people may feel uncomfortable about receiving, or giving, a hug, so a visit to your local library, the act of borrowing books, DVDs, CDs, and, ideally, the giving of feedback (to the staff themselves, to the councils, to the government, as publicly as possible, online, by phone, in writing, in person), would actually make us feel just as content as a hug, if not more so. You can ask us a question, or several questions, which could improve your lives and your understanding of what a library can do, just as much as a hug. I suppose what I’m saying in the end is that a hug can take many forms, when it comes to hugging your librarian. (more…)

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The Snowdrop Fairy, by Cicely M. Barker, 1923. Via flowerfairiesprints.com.

The Snowdrop Fairy, by Cicely M. Barker, 1923. Via flowerfairiesprints.com.

This post is brought to you by my realisation that not writing a review of a book within a week of finishing said book then creates an urgent need to reread the book in order to write said review. I finished The Colour of Magic rather quickly, but then wasn’t able to get to the computer to write anything about it. So now I’m rereading the book – which, let’s be honest, is absolutely not a chore – and rereading it more slowly, taking the time to appreciate the language and the knowledge behind the jokes. But the review is on its way, and I have the next three books borrowed from the library to begin immediately upon publishing said review. (more…)

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Cherbourg and I would like to wish you all a Happy Burns Night! Note: Cherbourg is my familiar and travelling companion, in the form of an orange octopus, if you don’t already know him.

Cherbourg practicing his "Ode to the Haggis", Burns Night January 2015 (My photo).

Cherbourg practicing his “Ode to the Haggis”, Burns Night January 2015 (My photo).

My favourite Robert Burns poem is unquestionably Tam O’Shanter, an epic ghost story (with entertaining social commentary) taking place one night in the drinking establishments and on the streets of Ayr. The language is striking, funny, rich, and just generally wonderful. You can watch an animation here, with Brian Cox (actor, not physicist!) reading the poem. It was created by Spiral Productions for the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, in Alloway, near Ayr.

I’ve never made a haggis from scratch myself, and am not sure how easy it would be these days to get all the necessary ingredients, but there is a recipe in the Glasgow Cookery Book which sounds wonderful, with a vivid language and poetry (possibly the Poetry of Ew, to the more squeamish) in itself. You can read it in the photo below.

How to make haggis from scratch, the Glasgow Cookery Book, p.126 (1962 edition; my photo).

How to make haggis from scratch, the Glasgow Cookery Book, p.126 (1962 edition; my photo).

Once made, you mix it with neeps and tatties, and tuck in:

Cherbourg enjoying his haggis, neeps, and tattoos (my photo).

Cherbourg enjoying his haggis, neeps, and tatties (my photo).

It’s quite common to give the haggis its own wee dram of whisky, and to have one yourself. Sometimes you can go too far, however, with both whisky and haggis:

Cherbourg overdid both the haggis and the whisky (my photo).

Cherbourg overdid both the haggis and the whisky (my photo).

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1) Drink vanilla spice latte without getting cream everywhere
2) Finish display of children’s books (subject: funny books) at work. Yes, it includes books on farts and on knickers.
3) Finish reading article and submit peer review of same (tonight)
4) Build Lego science lab with women scientists figures (tonight, as a reward for submitting said review)
5) Update blog roll on this blog – any suggestions?
6) Attempt to sleep through gales

How is your day shaping up?

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